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  • Moving Overseas to Work

    It seems that our economy is fucked... That and I need a change. I have always wanted to work in different countries, cultures and so on and yeah... I've considered TEFL.

    I was wondering if anybody else has done work abroad, or can make any suggestions or ideas?

    My flatmate, an aussie, said that Australia is great at the moment and I'd be able to get a bar or admin job easy.

    Obviously I've made a thread for TEFL. I love working with younger people and English is a skill I have.

    I have a degree in human rights... A bit of a waste of time if you ask me. I haven't had a chance to use it and I am feeling like I never will...

    Anybody who has any ideas... I'm all ears.
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Namaste View Post
    It seems that our economy is fucked... That and I need a change. I have always wanted to work in different countries, cultures and so on and yeah... I've considered TEFL.

    I was wondering if anybody else has done work abroad, or can make any suggestions or ideas?

    My flatmate, an aussie, said that Australia is great at the moment and I'd be able to get a bar or admin job easy.

    Obviously I've made a thread for TEFL. I love working with younger people and English is a skill I have.

    I have a degree in human rights... A bit of a waste of time if you ask me. I haven't had a chance to use it and I am feeling like I never will...

    Anybody who has any ideas... I'm all ears.
    Bear in mind the economy is pretty much fucked everywhere...

    But if you don't mind a taking low paid jobs I'd try to Australia for a year. You're not going to get that good a job, but it'll give you experience of being aborad and shows you are open to change and taking some risks, which never does harm on your CV

    ETA - and the most important bit is that it'll be fun
    She sang for mercy, for the living and the dead alike, for Bran and Rickon and Robb, for her sister Arya and her bastard brother Jon Snow, away off on the Wall. She sang for her mother and her father, for her grandfather Lord Hoster and her uncle Edmure Tully, for her friend Jeyne Poole, for old drunken King Robert, for Septa Mordane and Ser Dontos and Jory Casseland Maester Luwin, for all the brave knights and soldiers who would die today, and for thechildren and the wives who would mourn them

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    • #3
      I wouldn't go to Australia.
      I know why the caged bird sings, Only joy comes from song
      She's so rare and beautiful to others, Why not just set her free
      So she can fly, fly, fly
      Spreadin' her wings and her song
      Let her fly, fly fly
      For the whole world to see

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      • #4
        Moving from one location to another is quite a tough task to do; especially moving internationally is a very difficult procedure. There are so many things to be taken care; the most important thing is to move all our items. *spam removed*
        Last edited by Anti-Spam; 26-02-2011, 12:25 PM. Reason: Edited to remove spam

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        • #5
          you wont get much work TEFL in australia

          Youd probably also hate the racism

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          • #6
            On the other hand the australians do keep on bragging on how their economy is recession proof so there is teh possibilities for lots of work - buuuuuuut i would see it more as a working holiday more than anything else as the visa you get means you have to change jobs every 3 months so you don't build up any useful experience - unless you have any suitable skills which mean you can get a proper visa.

            TEFL might be useful but a proper teaching course so you can teach children or adults might be more useful
            DrPirate is technically my little brother apparently - even though hes like a bazillion foot taller than me (OK 6 inches)

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            • #7
              Update on this...

              As of tomorrow, I am officially debt free Which means I can start saving up!

              I've decided on TEFL and also on Latin America... Obviously, I'll need to save up money to get out there (would say... 4K be enough?). I think it'd be good to learn a second language and am interested in the region in general.

              So, gonna be living as cheap as possible for the next year. Will probably cancel my gym membership or at least cut it down substantially so I can save more and will probably return to Wales a month-5 weeks before I fly out, to do a course, so I can live for free and study and see my friends.
              Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.

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              • #8
                fabulous. Good luck sel x

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                • #9
                  I've just done a working holiday in NZ and loved it, i dont have a degree so i just got a admin temp job which was fine I spent all in all (holidays from NZ, rent/food/nights out/travel etc etc) about 5k in a year.
                  :heart: RAWR :flirt:

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                  • #10
                    I was gonna wait until next year to go abroad and teach English, but I'm actually considering going this year if financially viable (my job is starting to get unbearable)...

                    Say I went to South Korea to teach, how much cash would I need stored away before I go?
                    Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.

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                    • #11
                      I'd recommend spending a year working abroad to anyone. Besides broadening your horizons, I think it's always good to have a change of scenery and experience life in other places. Plus, think of the SUN! I plan to move somewhere warm when I finish my PhD (California maybe).
                      It's the fruit that makes it fruity, it's the juice that makes it juicy, it's the funk that makes it funky, it's the junk that makes the junkie

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                      • #12
                        How much money you need depends entirely on the job and country.

                        You've basically got four main costs:

                        - flights
                        - initial living costs
                        - bureaucracy
                        - training costs

                        The latter of the four is very dependent on the country you want to teach in, and can basically be split into countries which require certification, those that don't, and those that officially do, but you can still get work without it (albeit at the bottom of the barrel). But if you need qualification, it basically means you need a CELTA or equivalent. Prices for that are here. As you can see, they vary massively, but are fundamentally the same certificate everywhere in the world.

                        So then you're down to your basic start-up costs. Again, it depends on many different factors, and you often have different norms in different countries. In some countries (Taiwan, Korea, China and the Middle East, typically) it's possible to get jobs that will pay for accommodation and flights, but as you might expect, these aren't generally the best-paying schools. In Japan, some schools will offer you accommodation without the large costs usually associated with moving into a new apartment (security deposit, X months rent in advance, etc), but you have to pay for flights, etc. In countries like Vietnam or Thailand, it's not unreasonable to move there first and apply from within the country, but you're less likely to get any of the other perks (though my school does offer a $750 relocation allowance for people hired from outside the country).

                        Bear in mind that competition is stiff in this sector at the moment, and there are a lot of people in your position. Somewhere where flights and accommodation are paid and no teaching qualifications are required is going to attract a lot of people just interested in getting out of the current economic situation. South Korea has always been a favourite of Americans looking to clear their student debts, because the pay is high and the entry requirements are low (and they're effectively locked out of large parts of the European market because of labour laws). And with very high unemployment among young Americans atm, I expect a lot of them will be looking at this career option.

                        Oh, and as a feminist, you might be in for a shock in South Korea by all accounts.

                        I would strongly suggest you start reading the forums on Dave's ESL Cafe.

                        Have a look at the job board to see what's expected in different countries:
                        International
                        Korea
                        China

                        But for low startup costs, I suggest looking at employers that hire abroad from Japan, Korea, China and Taiwan. If you're looking at doing this slightly longer-term, I suggest saving up and doing the CELTA.

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                        • #13
                          I used to spend quite a bit of time in Brazil. I found it a great escape at first and my mental health was much better when I was there. But eventually things caught up with me, it was the same crap just a different country.
                          Blessed are the cracked for they let in the light.

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                          • #14
                            IWS, my mega feminist mate (she happens to be gay as well) told me about Korea.

                            Do you think it's worth me trying? I currently have a government job which may look reputable, I am good at standing up in front of people and projecting my voice... I just haven't taught before, beyond assisting young people to find work (kinda teaching them).
                            Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.

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                            • #15
                              The first rule of teaching ESL is to keep your mouth shut btw.

                              But yeah, I'd definitely do it. I would suggest that before you go to any interviews, you get down to International House London and ask them if there's any chance of you observing one of their lessons (preferably a kids and adults lesson, because they're quite different).

                              I think your decision depends on how you view teaching. If it's just a way to get to live abroad for a year, then don't waste money on expensive certificates, but don't expect a job with rigorous professional standards either. However, if it's something you're genuinely interested in, and think you may do it for a few years, then get qualified before you start working abroad, and you'll get a lot more from the work part of your experience. I guess the third option is just use a year working in Korea or Taiwan to save up the money to get qualified.

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